Tutor.com Linear Functions Session

May. 10, 2012

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Session Transcript - Math - Algebra II, 5/5/2012 10:13AM - Tutor.comSession Date: 5/5/2012 10:13AM
Length: 32.7 minute(s)
Subject: Math - Algebra II


System Message
[00:00:00] *** Please note: All sessions are recorded for quality control. ***

Arica (Customer)
[00:00:00] What is the area of a square with vertices (3,3), (6,6), and (6,0)?
[00:00:07] hi

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:00:12] Hello.
[00:00:16] Are you ready to get started?

Arica (Customer)
[00:00:31] yes

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:00:42] Now how would you like to solve this one?
[00:00:52] Would you like to graph it, then see if we can figure it out better?

Arica (Customer)
[00:01:02] ok

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:01:51] So how about you graph our vertices for us real quick.
[00:04:37] Where did you get (9,3) and (6,0) from?
[00:04:47] I mean I see (6,0)
[00:04:52] where's (9,3) from?

Arica (Customer)
[00:05:09] i forgot (9,3) its in the problem

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:05:13] Oh okay.
[00:05:43] Well now that we have all 4 vertices, we don't really have to graph it in order to figure out the area.
[00:05:50] Would you just like to do it algebraically?

Arica (Customer)
[00:05:57] sure

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:06:45] Okay. So what formula do you think we need to use?

Arica (Customer)
[00:07:09] the area formula

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:08:08] Well, we need to do something else first.
[00:08:33] How are we going to find out how long the sides of the square are?

Arica (Customer)
[00:08:52] by adding them

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:08:59] Not quite...
[00:09:05] Have you ever heard of the distance formula?

Arica (Customer)
[00:09:15] yes

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:09:23] That's what we're going to have to use.
[00:09:42] Now, what's true about all the sides of a square?

Arica (Customer)
[00:10:13] i dont know

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:10:30] Well what makes a square a square?

Arica (Customer)
[00:10:56] 4 corners

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:11:13] Not just that.... all the sides are the same length, right?

Arica (Customer)
[00:11:19] yea

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:11:50] So if we find the length of one of the sides, we know the length of all of them, right?

Arica (Customer)
[00:12:00] yea

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:12:22] So let's see if we can find the lengths of one of the sides.

Arica (Customer)
[00:12:28] ok

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:12:41] Now, can you pick two points that would form a side?

Arica (Customer)
[00:13:02] (6,6)

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:13:22] And....
[00:13:45] What other point would go with it to make a side?

Arica (Customer)
[00:13:51] (3,3)

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:13:59] That'll work.
[00:14:06] So, do you remember the distance formula?
[00:14:12] Or do you want me to write it out?

Arica (Customer)
[00:14:16] yes
[00:15:12] ok i did that already

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:15:23] Alright. And what did you get for the distance between the two points?

Arica (Customer)
[00:16:23] ok

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:17:50] So if that's the side length of the square, how do we find the area of the square?

Arica (Customer)
[00:18:09] mutiply

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:18:58] Or square it, either one.
[00:19:23] Not quite....
[00:19:54] Think back, when you got the square root, what did you take the square root of?

Arica (Customer)
[00:20:18] 18

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:20:32] Right.
[00:20:42] So if sqrt(18) is the side length, when you square that, you'll get...

Arica (Customer)
[00:20:48] is it 18 units^2

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:21:00] Got it.
[00:21:47] So did you have any other questions?

Arica (Customer)
[00:21:57] one more

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:22:51] Okay, go ahead.

Arica (Customer)
[00:25:10] do i do distance formula

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:25:19] Not quite....
[00:25:26] You'd do another formula that's similar, though.
[00:25:39] Look for a key word in the second sentence... it will tell you what formula to use.

Arica (Customer)
[00:25:44] midpoint formula

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:25:47] Right.
[00:27:11] Then we'll use the distance formula.

Arica (Customer)
[00:27:25] ok

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:27:35] Of course, if you want, you could use the distance formula, and then just divide by 2.

Arica (Customer)
[00:28:11] i got (.5,5)

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:28:15] Right.
[00:28:43] And now, you can use the distance formula for (-3,2) Panthersville and (.5,5) Falconton.
[00:31:35] You got it!
[00:31:39] Did you have any more questions?

Arica (Customer)
[00:32:18] do we have time to do one more

Richard W (Tutor)
[00:32:31] Since we have finished this question and there are students waiting, it would be best if you log back on and connect to another tutor to ask your next question.